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The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How Our Government Segregated America Edition PDF Free Download

The book The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How Our Government Segregated America is written by Richard Rothstein. WHEN, FROM 2014 TO 2016, riots in places like Ferguson, Baltimore, Milwaukee, or Charlotte captured our attention, most of us thought we knew how these segregated neighborhoods, with their crime, violence, anger, and poverty, came to be. We said they are “de facto segregated,” resulting from private practices, not government laws or policies.
De facto segregation, we tell ourselves, has several causes. When African Americans moved into a neighborhood like Ferguson, some racially biased white families decided to leave, and then as the number of black families grew, the neighborhood deteriorated, and “white flight” followed. Real estate agents kept whites away from black neighborhoods and blacks away from whites. Banks discriminated with “red lines,” refusing to grant mortgages to African-Americans or extracting unusually harsh terms from them on subprime loans. African Americans have generally not received the education that would enable them to earn enough to live in white suburbs, and as a result, many remain concentrated in urban neighborhoods. Also, black families prefer to live together.

 

Topics of this Edition

1. If San Francisco, then Everywhere?
2. Public Housing, Black Ghettos
3. Racial Zoning
4. “Own Your Own Home”
5. Private Agreements, Government Enforcement
6. White Flight
7. IRS Support and Compliant Regulators
8. Local Tactics
9. State-Sanctioned Violence
10. Suppressed Incomes
11. Looking Forward, Looking Back
12. Considering Fixes Epilogue
 

 

Overview of The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How Our Government Segregated America

In this groundbreaking history of the modern American metropolis, Richard Rothstein, a leading authority on housing policy, debunks the myth that America’s cities became racially divided through de facto segregation—that is, through individual prejudices, differences in income or the actions of private institutions such as banks and real estate agencies. Rather, The Color of the Law makes it indisputably clear that it was de jure segregation, the laws and policy decisions passed by local, state, and federal governments, that actually promoted the discriminatory patterns that continue to this day. from today.

 

Description:

Book Name The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How Our Government Segregated America
Author of Book Richard Rothstein
Edition 2017
Language English
Format PDF
Category Law Books

 

 

The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How Our Government Segregated America

 

 

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